The Early Mesolithic fisheries of southern Scandinavia

  • Written by Kenneth Ritchie, Harry K. Robson
  • doi: 10.23797/9783529018619-11

chapter 11 (pp. 289–303)

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Articlenumber: 978-3-529-01861-9

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chapter 1 (pp. 15–111)

Re-evaluation of the site Hohen Viecheln 1

chapter 2 (pp. 113–126)

Radiocarbon dating bone and antler artefacts from Mesolithic Hohen Viecheln (Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany)

chapter 3 (pp. 127–162)

The osseous technology of Hohen Viecheln: A Maglemosian idiosyncrasy?

chapter 5 (pp. 179–192)

Nordic Visits to Hohen Viecheln, Mecklenburg

chapter 6 (pp. 193–201)

The Mesolithic bone industries of northeast Germany and their geo-archaeological background

chapter 7 (pp. 203–238)

Early Mesolithic bone points from Schleswig-Holstein

chapter 8 (pp. 239–254)

Early Mesolithic hunting strategies for red deer, roe deer and wild boar at Friesack 4, a three-stage Preboreal and Boreal site in northern Germany

chapter 9 (pp. 255–262)

Lost at the bottom of the lake. Early and Middle Mesolithic leister points found in the bog Rönneholms Mosse, southern Sweden

chapter 10 (pp. 263–287)

Points of bone and antler from the Late Mesolithic settlement in Motala, eastern central Sweden

chapter 12 (pp. 305–318)

The Early Mesolithic bone and antler industry in Latvia, eastern Baltic

chapter 13 (pp. 319–339)

Early Mesolithic barbed bone points in the Volga-Oka interfluve

chapter 14 (pp. 341–365)

Bone and antler projectile points from the Meso-Neolithic site Zamostje 2, Moscow region, Russia

chapter 15 (pp. 367–382)

Early Mesolithic bone projectile points of the Urals

chapter 16 (pp. 383–404)

Hunting beneath the waves. Bone and antler points from North Sea Doggerland off the Dutch coast

chapter 17 (pp. 419–432)

Understanding the bone and antler assemblages from Star Carr

chapter 18 (pp. 405–418)

Excavations at Star Carr: past and present

Open Access

Description

Southern Scandinavian Mesolithic research has one of the longest traditions within archaeology, dating
back to the 1820s and 1830s. However, a combination of site visibility and an emphasis on the Mesolithic-
Neolithic transition has meant that research has primarily been directed towards the Late Mesolithic Ertebølle
culture (c. 5400–4000 cal. BC) at the expense of the Early Mesolithic Maglemose culture (c. 9600–6400
cal. BC). Whilst fishing during the Ertebølle culture is well studied (Enghoff 2011; Ritchie 2010), fishing
during the Early Mesolithic is rarely discussed in any detail. In this contribution we attempt to rectify this
imbalance by collating all readily available data on fish remains and related technologies within the literature.
Although our primary focus is the Early Mesolithic Maglemose culture of Southern Scandinavia, an
area encompassing Denmark, Scania in Sweden and Schleswig-Holstein in Northern Germany, we draw on
contemporaneous sites within the broader region to provide a more nuanced picture of the exploitation of
this important resource, fish.

Robson, H.K.; Ritchie, K.: The Early Mesolithic fisheries of southern Scandinavia, in: Gross et al. (edd.), Working at The Sharp End at Hohen Viecheln, Untersuchungen und Materialien zur Steinzeit in Schleswig-Holstein und im Ostseeraum, Vol. 10, pp. 289–303, DOI: 10.23797/9783529018619-11.

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